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Kill the squirrel to save the planet – Squirrels ‘are contributing to global warming’

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Kill the squirrel to save the planet

http://joannenova.com.au/2014/12/kill-the-squirrel-to-save-the-planet/

And you thought humans were special because they can control the climate. Move over Big-Coal, make way for the squirrels and beavers. They’ve been stirring up the soil releasing CO2, or damning up streams and producing methane. Daily Mail — Richard Gray Forget humans, RODENTS are the climate villains: Squirrels and beavers are contributing to global warming far more than previously thought Arctic ground squirrels churn up and warm soil in the Tundra, allowing carbon dioxide gas trapped in the ice to escape into the atmosphere Methane released from ponds created by beavers estimated to contribute 200 times more greenhouse gas to atmosphere than they did 100 years ago Climate scientists will have to tweak their models to include role of rodents Scientists insist that rodents role in global warming does not let humans off the hook but shows animals play more of a role than previously thought Wake up climate simulators, it’s time to add rodent-forcings to the models. Along with anthropogenic forcing (and beaver-effects), that’s three vertebrate families down, and only 181 to go. Squirrels have been around in some form for 40 million years, but in the last 100 they’ve become dangerous climate […]Rating: 8.8/10 (27 votes cast)

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