Monday, July 26, 2021
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Oops. 97% of papers that support the AGW ‘consensus’ includes one on cooking stove use in Bangladesh

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Excerpts from: http://www.joseduarte.com/blog/cooking-stove-use-housing-associations-white-males-and-the-97

The Cook et al. (2013) 97% paper included a bunch of psychology studies, marketing papers, and surveys of the general public as scientific endorsement of anthropogenic climate change.


Let’s go ahead and walk through that sentence again. The Cook et al 97% paper included a bunch of psychology studies, marketing papers, and surveys of the general public as scientific endorsement of anthropogenic climate change. 

I discovered that the following papers were included as endorsement, as “climate papers”, again in just ten minutes of looking. They are classified as either implicit or explicit endorsement, and were evidently included in the 97% figure:

Chowdhury, M. S. H., Koike, M., Akther, S., & Miah, D. (2011). Biomass fuel use, burning technique and reasons for the denial of improved cooking stoves by Forest User Groups of Rema-Kalenga Wildlife Sanctuary, Bangladesh. International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology18(1), 88–97.

Ding, D., Maibach, E. W., Zhao, X., Roser-Renouf, C., & Leiserowitz, A. (2011). Support for climate policy and societal action are linked to perceptions about scientific agreement. Nature Climate Change1(9), 462–466.


Egmond, C., Jonkers, R., & Kok, G. (2006). A strategy and protocol to increase diffusion of energy related innovations into the mainstream of housing associations. Energy Policy34(18), 4042–4049.


Gruber, E., & Brand, M. (1991). Promoting energy conservation in small and medium-sized companies.Energy Policy19(3), 279–287.


Ha-Duong, M. (2008). Hierarchical fusion of expert opinions in the Transferable Belief Model, application to climate sensitivity. International Journal of Approximate Reasoning49(3), 555–574.


Palmgren, C. R., Morgan, M. G., Bruine de Bruin, W., & Keith, D. W. (2004). Initial public perceptions of deep geological and oceanic disposal of carbon dioxide. Environmental Science & Technology38(24), 6441–6450.


Reynolds, T. W., Bostrom, A., Read, D., & Morgan, M. G. (2010). Now what do people know about global climate change? Survey studies of educated laypeople. Risk Analysis30(10), 1520–1538.


Semenza, J. C., Ploubidis, G. B., & George, L. A. (2011). Climate change and climate variability: personal motivation for adaptation and mitigation. Environmental Health10(1), 46.



In Table 1, page 2, the authors claimed that social science papers were classified as “Not climate related” and not included as endorsement cases. This is a false claim, and the authors should be investigated for fraud. (There were some papers that were classified as “Not climate related” in my quick search, but the above papers were not — they were classified is implicit or explicit endorsement.)

 

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